The Score

There are many similarities between mathematics and music. They are their own vocabulary, their own written language, their own way of describing the world around us, but while they are similar the Venn diagram that contains mathematics and music doesn’t always seem to have a huge overlap. This episode of Relatively Prime brings you three stories from that intersection. First a story of mathematics applied to music, in a way that no musician would have thought up. Next a story of what happen when you take mathematician and musician and combine it into a single person. Finally, the story of a composer and how he has harnessed the power of numbers as a music creation tool.

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The Application:

Scott Rickard is the director of the Complex & Adaptive Systems Laboratory, and a Professor of Electrical Engineering, at the University College Dublin. His work on mathematics and music was initially presented at TEDxMIA, the video of which spread like wildfire.

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The Mathematical Musician, or musical mathematician:

Robert Schneider is the lead singer of the band The Apples in Stereo and a cofounder of The Elephant Six Recording Collective. Oh, and he is currently studying for a Ph.D. of mathematics at Emory University.

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Robert Schneider is currently studying for a Ph.D. of mathematics at Emory University. Oh, and he is the lead singer of the band The Apples in Stereo and a cofounder of The Elephant Six Recording Collective.

Here is a video of the song, CPU, played during the story.

 

 

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The Composer:

Jonathan Middleton is a composer, and Professor of Composition at Eastern Washington University. His website, Musical Algorithms, provides a way to turn numbers, sequences, DNA, and many other things into compositions.

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All music on this episode was provided by the guests



6 Responses to “The Score”

  1. Talithin says:

    Great episode, enjoying the series so far. Can’t wait for the rest.

  2. You might really enjoy these examples of generating computer music using programmatic one-liners
    http://countercomplex.blogspot.com/2011/10/algorithmic-symphonies-from-one-line-of.html

    and
    http://countercomplex.blogspot.com/2011/10/some-deep-analysis-of-one-line-music.html

    The program generates a sawtooth wave by printing the numbers 0 – 32767 repeatedly to the computer’s sound device and then modifies the pattern by evaluating a function on the generated numbers. Really interesting stuff!
    Love the podcast!

  3. […] series Relatively Prime has created a show about 3 composers who use math in their creations called The Score. (65m) Explores creating ‘ugly music’ (TED video), a new scale based on logs (video […]

  4. Ot says:

    I would like to remind you about Dr. Guerino Mazzola.

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